Six ways to give back to the environment this Mandela Day and beyond

Mandela Day calls on us all, every day, to make the world a better place. Each year on the 18th July we look back on what has been done,and forward to what will be done. This year we celebrate 100 years since Nelson Mandela’s birth. All are encouraged to contribute 67 minutes of public service. One minute is given for each year of Mandela’s 67 years of public service,starting in 1942 when he first started to campaign for the human rights of all South Africans.

“I dream of our vast deserts, of our forests, of all our great wildernesses. We must never forget that it is our duty to protect this environment”. Nelson Mandela

What are you going to do for your 67 minutes of service? Not sure where to start? Here we offer up some suggestions on how you may want to get involved in serving your community and giving back to your environment.

JOIN A LITTER CLEAR UP

 

Litter: The bane of the life of any environmentalist. We are all far too accustomed to the convenience of packaged foods and other goods. Once that packaging has served its useful purpose in life it usually either ends up in landfill or often becomes environmental pollution. For starters, litter is unsightly and an eyesore. Nobody wants to see it polluting their local nature reserves or national parks. Far worse are its impacts on public health, wildlife and watercourses. Often it will end up finding its way into the sea, impacting on marine life too.

The good news here is that here you can make a difference. For Mandela Day there are many organised litter clearing events happening around the country,to the benefit of our communities, rivers, mountains, nature reserves, national parks and wildlife. Many community groups also have regular cleaning events to clear litter pollution in our wetlands, waterways and on our beaches. Check out social media platforms for more information on events happening around the country and consider lending a hand. Conservation and environmental action starts at home so find out what is going on in your area or start your own initiatives.

CLEAR SOME ALIENS

 

So what is all this talk of ‘aliens’ that has been in the media before and during the current drought? One may be confused into thinking we are referring to extra-terrestrial life here. In fact,alien invasive vegetation comprises plants that have been introduced from overseas that have become invasive in our own ecosystems,outcompeting our local indigenous flora,choking our river systems,often becoming a fire hazard and guzzling far too much precious water that could be filling our dams. There is no doubt,they need to go.

Many of our local community groups are taking action here, so check out their social media platforms to find out where and when and get involved.

PLANT A GARDEN

 

With the current drought and impacts of a changing climate making their presence known, now is a more important time than any for us to realise that growing indigenous and gardening waterwise is a necessity rather than a choice. Growing a water guzzling European style garden with swimming pools,sweeping lawns,roses and hydrangeas needs to be a thing of the past in our water scarce country. Perhaps a garden in your local community is looking dead and sad following several dry summers and needs cheering up?

If there is a communal outdoor space you know that needs some love,why not donate some indigenous plants and work with and support the owners in making them grow. Not only will it benefit the people that use it but also the local wildlife too. 

JOIN A FRIENDS GROUP

 

Do you use a green space in your community regularly for recreation? Chances are your local park or nature reserve will have a Friends group. Friends groups are a strong force for community conservation and a place to volunteer your time and skills to the benefit of your local environment.

They liase with the main management authority for the space and might get involved in alien clearing,litter picking, environmental education, restoration work, conservation planning, organising talks and walks and much more. Your membership fee will go to helping support their work in conserving and making that green space that you use the place it is. Why not consider volunteering too? Get involved, attend events and consider serving on their committees for a rewarding way to give back to your community.

SHARE

Raising awareness about the importance of conserving and protecting our environment is a key way to inspire others to get involved. So don’t keep quiet about your efforts, share them with your friends and networks on your social media platforms. Our partners at WESSA (Wildlife and Environmental Society of South Africa) are inviting you to join the #WESSAChallenge and pledge your 67 minutes for a better environment, then post a pic of you,your family and friends doing your bit for the environment this July. 

DONATE

Feeling too pushed for time to squeeze in any volunteering? Why not consider making a donation to a charity of your choice to support their vital work?

At the end of it all, don’t forget that every day should be a Mandela Day. Make time to serve your community and help protect and conserve your local environment. Community conservation is a critical force and anyone can make a difference.

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Wildflower Wonders: Where to find the best blommetjies this Spring

This winter, after three long and dry years in succession, the rain came. The drought’s impact has been pervasive, affecting the economy, agriculture, tourism and much more. Above average rainfall this June has provided some respite and improved dam levels, but we are far from out of the woods yet.

However, good winter rains are making it increasingly likely that we will have some wonderful displays of wildflowers this spring. Already there are beautiful carpets of Oxalis giving their winter display along our road verges. We have hand-picked for you a selection of our favourite places to go and experience the Cape’s world famous wildflower displays. All of these stunning places are within five hours drive of Cape Town, easily accessible on a weekend for those of you with limited time available.

NAMAQUALAND 

Nieuwoudtville

The small town of Nieuwoudtville lies at the top of the Bokkeveld Escarpment, five hours drive north along the N7 from Cape Town. It is not without reason that it is known as the ‘Bulb Capital of the World’. The town is home to Hantam National Botanical Gardens (NBG) one of South Africa’s newest NBGs, run by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI). Hantam NBG is 6000 Ha in size encompassing Nieuwoudtville Shale Renosterveld, Nieuwoudtville-Roggeveld Dolerite Renosterveld and Hantam Succulent Karoo.

This unique range of untransformed habitats makes this the place to see many of the rare and special plant species known from the Bokkeveld Escarpment. The garden has nine different hiking trails that allow those of differing levels of fitness to explore as they please. Members of the Botanical Society enjoy free entrance to this and all of South Africa’s NBGs. Additional tourist information for the area can be found at www.nieuwoudtville.com

WEST COAST

West Coast National Park

West Coast National Park lies on the coast between the small towns of Yzerfontein and Langebaan just 1.5 hours drive north of Cape Town. The park is a mix of Strandveld and Hopefield Sand Plain Fynbos.  During August and September visitors to the park are rewarded by the most spectacular displays of flowers in the Seeberg and Postberg sections of the Park. For the more energetic the two day overnight Postberg hiking trail can be done, with an overnight stop (bring your own tents) at Plankiesbaai. Bookings and tariff information can be obtained from Geelbek Information Centre on 022 707 9902. Entrance to the park is R76 for South African Nationals and residents (with ID) and free for Wildcard Holders.

Tienie Versfeld Nature Reserve

Tienie Versfeld Nature Reserve is 20 Ha in size and found just outside the Swartland town of Darling, an hour north of Cape Town. The reserve was formerly part of a farm that was donated to the Botanical Society by Marthinus Versfeld. Marthinus’s sister Muriel was one of the founder members of the Darling Wildflower Society. The reserve is open all year round, but the most spectacular blooms can be seen during the spring season from August to September. Entrance to the reserve is free.

Waylands Farm Wildflower Reserve

Also near the beautiful town of Darling is the fantastic Waylands Farm Wildflower Reserve. The reserve was founded by Fredrick Duckett in the early 1900s and is home to more than 300 different plant species, many of which are geophytes. The reserve forms an integral part of the farm and is grazed from late November to the end of April each year. The spring flower season reaches its peak from the end of August to early September.

CEDERBERG 

Ramskop Wildflower Garden

Three hours drive north of Cape Town on the N7 is the small town of Clanwilliam, which lies at the foot of the Cederberg Mountain chain. Adjacent to the municipal campsite on the banks of the Clanwilliam Dam is the beautiful Ramskop Wildflower Garden. There are more than 300 species of different wildflowers to be seen, and spectacular views down over the dam and up to the Cederberg mountains beyond. Entry is R25 and the gardens are open until 4:30pm during August and September. (Info: 027 482 8000).

Biedouw Valley

 

The Biedouw Valley is one of the Cederberg’s hidden wildflower gems. It can be reached either via Calvinia or the Pakhuis Pass from Clanwilliam. The Biedouw River is one of the tributaries of the Doring River. The valley is bounded by the Biedouw Mountains to the north and the Tra Tra Mountains to the south. The name ‘Biedouw’ refers to the common plant name ‘Bietou’, although there are several plants that go by this name so it is not clear to what species the name originally refers. In spring local farmers restrict livestock grazing in the area to further enhance the stunning wildflower displays. 

CAPE TOWN  

Rondebosch Common

 

Rondebosch Common lies at the heart of Cape Town’s Southern Suburbs. This 40 Ha site is of international conservation importance, being one of the last fragments of Critically Endangered Cape Flats Sand Fynbos, a highly biodiverse vegetation type that only occurs in the greater Cape Town area. It is home to around 250 plant species.

The site is under the custodianship of City Parks and their work is supported by the Friends of Rondebosch Common, affiliated with the Wildlife and Environmental Society of South Africa (WESSA). Each spring the Friends run a series of walks lead by dedicated volunteers to see the spring flowers on the Common. All are welcome and becoming a Friend is encouraged to support the valuable conservation work taking place. More information can be found on the Friends’ Facebook group.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/Friends.of.Rondebosch.Common/

 

CONSEQUENCES OF PROPOSED NEW CONSTITUTION AS PUT FORWARD BY THE KIRSTENBOSCH BRANCH COMMITTEE

The Botanical Society wishes to address the consequences of a proposed constitutional amendment as put forth by the Kirstenbosch branch committee. It is important to note that the proposed constitution is put forth by a minority of Kirstenbosch Branch Members and constitutes amendments which in the Council’s belief are self-serving and divisive, for the following reasons:

  1. The Council of the Botanical Society implemented an inclusive process to amend the current constitution by which all branches were invited to input into the development of an updated constitution. However, select members of the Kirstenbosch branch chose not to partake meaningfully in this process, not wait for the first draft of the constitution to be circulated but rather put forward their own constitution that shows no regard for the whole community of members for which the Botanical Society is responsible.
  2. In terms of clause 17.4 of the ‘proposed constitution’ put forward by select Kirstenbosch Branch members, each branch is to become a voluntary association on its own. The branches will still be eligible to receive funding from the Society but will be allowed to enter into legal agreements with staff, sponsors and other parties on their own behalf.
  3. The first thing to realize is that SANBI’s relationship is with the Botanical Society as it is currently constituted. SANBI has indicated that it wants to deal with a centralized legal corporate entity where accountability resides and where checks and balances are in place.
  4. SANBI has indicated that it is not prepared to enter into independent arrangements with each branch.
  5. SANBI has advised the Botanical Society that if the branches become autonomous it will reconsider its arrangement with the Botanical Society as it is not prepared to deal with individual branches. This will likely result in negative implications for the current membership benefit of free entry into the various National Botanical Gardens.
  6. The proposed constitution is being driven by a minority within the Kirstenbosch branch. The branch continues to conduct its affairs outside the scope of their authority as set out in the Branch Operating Manual and Constitution, and has failed to account for a lack of adequate financial controls that were uncovered in the prior year’s audit. The Kirstenbosch Branch wishes to be autonomous to increase the funds available in its own coffers whilst making no undertakings to spread and share any resources at its disposal with less resourced and remote branches.
  7. The self-serving nature of the proposed amendments aside, the proposed constitution serves only to give the Kirstenbosch Branch free rein outside of the partnership between the Society and SANBI.

In short, the role of branches has always been to implement the vision of the Society as a whole.  This means that the Society takes into consideration the needs of all branches.  To have branches operate in isolation and effectively move in different directions with less, if any, oversight simply cannot be in the best interest of all members of the Society.

For the reasons set out above it is clear that the ‘proposed constitution’ does not serve the broader objectives of SANBI and the Botanical Society, and serve only to benefit the intentions of a minority. It is therefore recommended that members of the society do not support the motions put forth by members of the Kirstenbosch Branch.

#SecretSeason: Winter at Karoo Desert National Botanical Gardens

As winter arrives at the Cape, temperatures fall and the winter rain starts it can be tempting to spend all your time tucked up inside away from the cold. Winter is the time to make the most of those beautiful sunny days in between the rain, perfect for getting out and about without the summer heat. Now is the time to experience the beauty that is winter in this part of the world.

Above: The rugged and scenic beauty of the Du Toits Kloof Pass between Paarl and Worcester on the N1.

Karoo Desert National Botanical Gardens (NBG) is located next to the small town of Worcester, an easy 1.5 hour drive from Cape Town and closer still for those based in the Winelands. It is a scenic drive along one of the most beautiful sections of the N1, travelling through the rugged mountains of the Du Toitskloof Pass. At this time of year huge waterfalls can be seen tumbling down rock walls from high above. While travelling through the pass from the Cape Town side, one can see the vegetation change from the Mediterranean climate fynbos to the more arid climate adapted Worcester Robertson Karoo.

Top: Aloidendron ramosissimum Above: Ruschia maxima

Karoo Desert NBG showcases the rich diversity of unique and extraordinary flora that come from the more arid parts of South Africa, including the Richtersveld, Succulent Karoo and Klein Karoo. The garden is 154 hectares in size, of which 11 hectares are cultivated and the remainder is natural vegetation. There are two hiking trails that allow visitors to explore the wider landscape beyond the more formally cultivated areas of the garden.

Above: Flowers and open seed capsule of Cheridopsis pillansii

The shorter Shale Trail is around 1km in length with the main winter highlight being the orange and yellow flashes of colour in the veld from flowering Aloe microstigma. The Grysbokkie Trail is 3.4 km long and will take visitors steeply up into a kloof above the gardens and ascends from the Worcester Robertson Karoo vegetation up into the Breede Valley Renosterveld above. Those who make the climb are richly rewarded by the views from the top of Beacon Hill (526m) over Worcester and the surrounding landscape.

Above: Pelargonium echinatum

Winter is a time when many plant species from the arid and semi-arid vegetation types that are represented at Karoo Desert NBG come into bloom. This is particularly true of the huge variety of different Aloes that are grown here. The huge and striking quiver trees (Aloidendron dichotomum, Aloidendron ramossissimum and Aloidendron pillansii) produce many bright yellow inflorescences between June and August that are often visited for nectar by sugarbirds and sunbirds. The blooms are pollinated by ants and bees.

Above: Euphorbia dregeana

Also worth looking out for is the Giant Mountain Vygie (Ruschia maxima) with its delicate pink flowers. This plant blooms most of the year and makes a great waterwise addition to arid and semi-arid gardens. In the higher reaches of the garden the pale yellow blooms of Cheridopsis pillansii can be seen in contrast to the silver leaves of this plant. This plant is one of several species named after botanist Neville Pillans (1884-1964), succulent enthusiast and eminent collector of Stapeliads. Pillans was formerly a member of staff at the Bolus Herbarium at the University of Cape Town.

Above: Nymania capensis 

Visitors to the garden are often intrigued by the strange shaped pink seed heads of the Chinese Lantern Tree (Nymania capensis). These allow the seeds to be wind transported away from the parent plant, where they can be blown into the shelter of a nurse plant, allowing germination of seeds once rain has arrived and conditions for growth are suitable.

Top: Aloiampelos tenuior Above: Euphorbia caurulescens

Here we offer just a taster of what this extraordinary garden has to offer during these winter months of colour. As with all our National Botanical Gardens, visitors to Karoo Desert NBG enjoy free entrance throughout the year. Make the most of your membership and enjoy exploring South Africa’s rich plant diversity as showcased in our stunning gardens.

Out of the dust: A mass flowering of Brunsvigia bosmaniae

The small Namaqualand town of Nieuwoudtville lies on the Bokkeveld Escarpment, just north of the border between the Western and Northern Cape. It is reached via the Vanrhys Pass, named after Petrus Benjamin Van Rhyn who was a clergyman and member of parliament in the old mission settlement of Troe Troe. The pass winds its way up from the quartz gravel plains of the Knersvlakte to the high altitude renosterveld and fynbos of the escarpment, home to many rare endemic plant species.

It is not without reason that Nieuwoudtville is known as the ‘Bulb Capital of the World’. In spring the veld comes into bloom in a plethora of colour, drawing visitors from all over South Africa and beyond to see the spectacular displays. Here BotSoc partner the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) manages Hantam, one of the country’s newest National Botanical Gardens (NBG). Hantam NBG is more than 6000 Hectares in size and conserves habitat of Nieuwoudtville Shale Renosterveld, Nieuwoudtville-Roggeveld Dolerite Renosterveld and Hantam Succulent Karoo. Visitors to the garden have a choice of nine different walking trails to explore the garden, of differing lengths to suit all levels of fitness.

The last couple of years has seen South Africa experience the worst drought in living memory. Water has become a commodity all too precious and the winter rain that brings the veld into bloom in spring did not come. The veld remained dry and the bulbs remained dormant,  with the drought impacting on livelihoods in farming, tourism and on wildlife.

However, as the hot and desperately dry summer ended, autumn arrived at the Cape. And this autumn the rain came. Ephemeral streams long dry started to flow and green returned to the veld. The rain triggered the coming of an extraordinary phenomenon, last seen in Nieuwoudtville four years ago. On municipal land managed by Hantam NBG and the adjacent WWF Wildflower Reserve, the previously dry ground began to crack, and flower buds began to emerge.

These flowers are the huge autumn flowering geophyte Brunsvigia bosmaniaeor Maartblom, a member of the Amaryllidaceae family. This species is distributed from southwestern Namibia southwards to Tygerberg north of Cape Town and inland to the Roggeveld and southern Tanqua Karoo. It is most common around Nieuwoudtville and Vanrhynsdorp where it occurs in huge and dense colonies. The type material was first collected near Piketberg in 1927 but did not flower in cultivation until 1932.

Huge moisture filled bulbs allow this plant to survive long periods of drought. Their flowering is triggered at the end of summer when intense thunderstorms arrive following incursions of tropical air that arrive in Namaqualand from the north. These perfect conditions to trigger flowering do not happen every year: These Brunsvigias often have a long wait to reproduce.

As the days go by and the Brunsvigias come into flower, the veld slowly turns an intense shade of pink. The blooms are the size of footballs. Word spreads and visitors come to Nieuwoudtville from far and wide to see this spectacular floral display. The display is fleeting, lasting around a fortnight. As flowering ends the infruitescences dry out and come adrift from the bulb, allowing the wind to blow them across the landscape, distributing the seeds as they go. Meanwhile, flowering done, the huge leaves start to emerge, and will remain until the bulb goes dormant during the summer months. The Brunsvigia bosmaniae of Nieuwoudtville must now wait, until the next autumn thunderstorms come.

MySchool Vote4Charity Challenge

The countdown has started! You have just one day left to join the MySchool MyVillage MyPlanet #Vote4Charity challenge. Cast your vote for the Botanical Society of South Africa and we get to win a share of R1 million. For every vote submitted we receive a R5 donation and for every additional referral from simply sharing to social we receive a further R5 donation. All at no cost to you – Support your favourite charity for free! Participants will also be entered into a prize draw and stand a chance to win R5000. Read on to find out more about our work and how to cast your vote.

Branching Out

The Botanical Society, run by our team from Head Office at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens, has sixteen branches across the country. These are mostly run by dedicated volunteers and allows you to get involved with your BotSoc, wherever you are in the country. Our branches run a variety of activities, including talks, hikes, environmental education, alien hacking and much more, allowing you to make a difference to conservation and awareness about South Africa’s megadiverse flora where you live. Some of our branches are based at National Botanical Gardens, where their activities are enhanced and enriched by collaboration with the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).

 Communicating the Conservation Message

In line with South Africa’s National Strategy for Plant Conservation, we place a strong focus on communicating the conservation message. We educate and raise awareness through our publications, including our quarterly journal ‘Veld & Flora’, our online magazine ‘Botanical’, our blog and social platforms. We are also active in environmental education, both through our branches and the Botanical Education Trust. We make possible a range of publications including our range of regional botanical field guides, essential for those getting to grips with our vast and unique flora. Our newest resource ‘Learning About Cycads’ helps learners understand this imperilled and fascinating plant group through a series of activities tailored to the National Curriculum.

Building Capacity in the Conservation Sector

 

We recently signed a new memorandum of agreement with the Cape Peninsula University of Technology’s (CPUT) Nature Conservation Diploma Programme. This marks the continuation of our collaboration for a further three years. Through funding from BotSoc, students undertaking the course are funded through the completion of a practical training programme. This has meant that all students could complete this part of the course and those who could not otherwise afford to participate were not excluded.

BotSoc has also facilitated student visits to Kirstenbosch NBG and the SANBI herbarium. Participating students said that BotSoc was “investing in their future” in a way that far better prepared them for future work in the conservation sector. Comments Professor Joseph Kioko (Programme Director) “BotSoc is investing in sustainable, tangible partnerships. It does not come better than this….”. BotSoc would like to thank the donors who have so generously supported this programme. We couldn’t do it without you!

Conserving Threatened Species

Through our partners the Custodians of Rare and Endangered Wildflowers (CREW), we work to conserve and monitor our imperilled flora around the country. We contribute funding that allows the employment of CREW interns, thus providing career development opportunities and additional capacity to this world class citizen science-based conservation programme. Some of our former interns have gone on to become leading scientists in our conservation community. We would like to thank all of our hardworking CREW volunteers for their invaluable contributions.

How to Vote for Us

To vote for the Botanical Society of South Africa, simply visit http://myschool.co.za/vote4charity, select ‘The Botanical Society’ from the searchable drop down list and enter your MySchool or Woolies card number to cast your vote. No MySchool card? No problem! You can still vote after applying online to receive your free card at the same time. We thank you for your support!

Growing the Future: An Introduction to the Botanical Education Trust

Written by Charles and Julia Botha

Why is the Botanical Education Trust so important?

South Africa is home to one of the richest floras on earth. It has more than 10% of the world’s flowering plant species and is the only country that has a whole plant kingdom that falls entirely within its borders. The Cape Floral Kingdom has more than 20% of the African continent’s plant species, despite covering less than 0.5% of its total land area. The Cape Peninsula alone has more plant species than the whole of the United Kingdom. However, many South African plant species are under threat. Populations of threatened species are lost underneath housing development from a rapidly growing human population. They are outcompeted by alien invasive plants or collected en mass for the medicinal plant trade.

What is the Botanical Education Trust?

The Botanical Education Trust was founded to educate people about the importance of South Africa’s diverse flora and biodiversity in view of these challenges. The organisation operates under the auspices of the Botanical Society of South Africa. It is fully registered as a Trust and is audited annually. In addition, it has been approved as a PBO (Public Benefit Organisation) and has been granted exemption from donations tax and estate duty by SARS. This includes a Section 18A exemption certificate which permits any donor to treat donations to the Trust as a tax deductible expense.

Neil Gerber, a past president of the Society of Chartered Accountants, is the Honorary Treasurer of the Trust and Professor Julia Botha is the Secretary. Some of the country’s leading botanists serve as Trustees on the Botanical Education Trust’s Board, namely Professor Braam Van Wyk, Professor of Plant Science at the University of Pretoria, Dr Neil Crouch from the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) and Dr Hugh Glen.  Zaitoon Rabaney, Executive Director of the Botanical Society of South Africa and horticulturalist Chris Dalzell also serve as Trustees. The Trust is chaired by Charles Botha, a semi-retired businessman.

What does it do?

The objectives of the Botanical Education Trust are:

  1. To conserve and promote the indigenous flora of South Africa.
  2. To advance education and research in the field of our indigenous flora.
  3. To fund literature pertaining to indigenous flora and factors that influence it.

What projects has the Trust funded?  

Last year the Botanical Education Trust celebrated its 10th Anniversary. Since it was founded the Trust has awarded grants to the value of more than R865,000. One of the projects supported was an environmental education programme based at the National Botanical Gardens which encouraged learners to make informed environmental decisions and educated them about conservation. The Botanical Education Trust has also funded taxonomic studies, threatened and data deficient species research and research on biological control of alien invasive plants. In addition, funding has also been contributed towards the publication of important botanical literature.

In 2017 the Trust received 22 applications, five of which were selected for funding, receiving a total of R113,000. Sharon Louw (Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife) received an award to study the effects of fire on the Common Sugarbush Protea caffra. Findings from this research will be used to inform best management practice for the Protea Savanna system, which will ultimately benefit the flora as a whole. Dr Francis Siebert, of North-West University, received funding for her project on different forb species in semi-arid savanna. In this ecosystem forbs represent a vital food source for a variety of different insects including butterflies.

The Mistbelt Forests of Kwa-Zulu Natal have long been exploited and only an estimated six patches of primary forest are now left.  Those which remain are now also highly threatened by alien invasive plants. Dr Jolene Fisher from the University of the Witwatersrand has received funding to monitor the extent, diversity and quality of these forests. Dr Marina Koekemoer from SANBI works to help people identify South Africa’s fascinating and diverse flora. A grant has been made towards her publication of the Complete Plant Families of southern Africa. Natasha Visser, from the University of Johannesburg, also received funding to carry out a taxonomic study of the southern African genus Thesium. This genus has been identified as a high priority for taxonomic revision. This work is of vital importance in advancing knowledge about South Africa’s unique and highly biodiverse flora.

The Botanical Education Trust would like to thank all donors who have made these grants possible. We thank you for your support.

How can you help?

Donations, no matter how small, will serve conservation in perpetuity because only interest on capital is used and all donations are capitalised. Even if contributions are not immediate, legacies left behind will be to the permanent benefit of our indigenous flora.

Payments can be made to:

Botanical Society of South Africa – Durban Coastal Branch

Nedbank, Durban Branch Code – 135226

Account Number – 1352029901

Please state clearly on all donations that it is for the Botanical Education Trust and fax the deposit slip to 086 651 8969 or email to botsoc-kzn@mweb.co.za. Payments can also be made via the donate button on the KZN Coastal Branch website.